0 Things Community Project

Contributed by
Lizabeth Arum

Educators should use the omissions in the popular model repositories to encourage students to research, design and share new 3D models that promote social justice and equality.

Josh Ajima, a.k.a. DesignMakeTeach, an Instructional Facilitator for Technology at Loudoun County Public Schools, first introduced the idea of “0 Things” at Construct3D 2017 last May. In his presentation he shared his and his students’ experiences of being able to find a multitude of Yoda imagery online, but no 3D models that represented his or his students' culture or heritage. Josh pointed out that when he searched Thingiverse, a popular 3D printing repository with over 2 million things, he found 0 relevant models for instructional topics. He then challenged the audience to view each empty search as an opportunity, and to use the power of 0 things as inspiration to create powerful, engaging designs and projects.

The Challenge

Over the 2018 Spring semester, have your students create artifacts that speak to who they are and where they come from. Use design to give them a voice. Post all the models on YouMagine and Thingiverse, and tag appropriately. And don’t forget to add the tag "#0Things."

We’ll host an exhibit of all the work at Construct3D 2018. At this event, we will also host a mini hackathon so that attendees can join together to help fill in what is still missing. Everyone should be represented. With the lower costs and higher access associated with desktop 3D modeling and printing, there is no excuse for 0 Things.

   


Some Inspiration

   

Minifig Transgender Sign

by DesignMakeTeach

   

   

Minifig Pussyhats

by DesignMakeTeach

   

Friendship 7 space capsule

by DesignMakeTeach


Commemorative Observances

  • African American History Month (February)

    National African American History Month in February celebrates the contributions that African Americans have made to American history in their struggles for freedom and equality and deepens our understanding of our Nation's history.

  • Women's History Month (March)

    Women’s History Month honors and celebrates the struggles and achievements of American women throughout the history of the United States.

  • National Developmental Disabilities Awareness Month (March)

    National Developmental Disabilities Awareness Month was established to increase awareness and understanding of issues affecting people with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

  • National Multiple Sclerosis Education and Awareness Month (March)

    National Multiple Sclerosis Education and Awareness Month was established to raise public awareness of the autoimmune disease that affects the brain and spinal cord and assist those with multiple sclerosis in making informed decisions about their health care.

  • Celebrate Diversity Month (April)

    Started in 2004 to recognize and honor the diversity surrounding us all. By celebrating differences and similarities during this month, organizers hope that people will get a deeper understanding of each other.

  • Autism Awareness Month (April)

    Established to raise awareness about the developmental disorder that affects children’s normal development of social and communication skills.

  • Law Day (May 1)

    Law Day is a national day to celebrate the rule of law and its contributions to the freedoms Americans enjoy.

  • Jewish American Heritage Month (May)

    Jewish American Heritage Month is a month to celebrate the contributions Jewish Americans have made to America since they first arrived in New Amsterdam in 1654.

  • Older American  Month (May)

    Older Americans Month is celebrated each May to honor and recognize older Americans for the contributions they make to our families, communities and society. The Administration for Community Living, a division of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, issues a theme for Older Americans Month.

  • Asian Pacific Heritage Month (May)

    Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month is a month to celebrate the contributions Asian/Pacific Americans have made to American history, society and culture.

  • Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Pride Month (June)

    Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Pride Month commemorates the events of June 1969 and works to achieve equal justice and equal opportunity for LGBT Americans.

  • National Hispanic Heritage Month (September 15 - October 15)

    National Hispanic Heritage Month celebrates and recognizes the contributions Hispanic Americans have made to American society and culture and to honor five of our Central American neighbors who celebrate their Independence days in September.

  • Constitution Day and Citizenship Day (September 17)

    Constitution Day and Citizenship Day is observed each year on September 17 to commemorate the signing of the Constitution on September 17, 1787 and “recognize all who, by coming of age or by naturalization, have become citizens.”

  • National Disability Employment Awareness Month (October)

    National Disability Employment Awareness Month celebrates the accomplishments in the workplace of persons with disabilities and reaffirms the commitment to ensuring equal employment opportunities to all citizens.

  • American Indian Heritage Month (November)

    National American Indian Heritage Month celebrates and recognizes the accomplishments of the peoples who were the original inhabitants, explorers and settlers of the United States.

  • Human Rights Day (December 10)

    Human Rights Day is observed each year to commemorate the adoption of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) by the United Nations General Assembly on December 10, 1948.

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